This stuff tastes way, way better than it looks.  :-)  It’s a tasty, warm, cheesy, seafood-y delight I’ve always loved; in fact, the only reason I even have a casserole dish is that my mother got me one when I went to college just to make sure I could make some seafood casserole every now and then.  Now that I can assemblepasta that holds up to being baked (and even to being reheated later!), it’s a must-have.
Divider

Hi! I know this is a terribly un-Christmasy post for December 23rd, but I am visiting relatives and haven’t had time to perfect any more desserts (and goodness knows I can’t give you an imperfect dessert!). So, a dinner for you :D. This one is nice because it is really quite quick.

Divider

They’re quick, easy, and delicious (the only time-consuming part is if you want to really wait for the butter to soften properly).  The dough is so well-behaved I’ve never had to roll out an uncooperative tortilla twice (which is a major improvement over the last version of this recipe, that’s for sure).  I know, I know, not a very Christmas-y post to do a few weeks before Christmas, but these are still really good.  :-)  I don’t even bother topping them before I eat them, though of course you could make quesadillas or burritos or what have you if you like.
Divider

I had never heard of wassail before the first cold day (after we were living in an apartment) in Irving, TX when Jennifer mentioned that it sounded like a tasty treat for such a nippy day. Apparently it’s a common holiday treat for her family. My family always tended more toward punch or hot chocolate, or maybe spiced cider, so I’d never heard of it. However, we made some and I decided it was quite nice :D. And, because it has so much fruit juice in it already, it was quite easy to adapt to use honey instead of white sugar. In this case the honey flavor is subsumed in the spices, and it just lends a nice light sweetness to the overall drink.

Divider

Making biscuits was always a fun treat when we were kids.  I was always amazed at how all you had to do was add milk to Bisquick, and real dough would appear — and it was fun to work with, too!  Of course, back then I thought of Bisquick as some kind of magical homogeneous substance that you used to bake, and flour and baking powder and sugar and shortening as rare arcane components tucked in the back of the pantry, only to be pulled out when required once or twice a year.  :-)
Divider